in

Beginning of the indictment for the January 2015 terrorist attacks

The national anti-terrorism prosecution began Monday morning to take its requisitions for the trial of the January 2015 attacks that struck Charlie Hebdo, a municipal police officer in Montrouge and the Hyper Cacher, more than three months after the opening of this historic hearing. “There are events that mark us all for life, there are trials more than others that make the voice tremble, that make the heart squeeze,” said general counsel Julie Holveck, throwing little after 9:30 am this indictment in two voices which must last until Tuesday.

On January 7, 8 and 9, 2015, the Saïd brothers and Chérif Kouachi and Amédy Coulibaly carried the jihadist fight in France, killing 17 people and sowing fear throughout the world. They “stole our most precious asset: our security,” said the general counsel before the special assize court in Paris.

Fourteen defendants have been on trial since September 2, prosecuted for their alleged logistical support to the three jihadists, shot dead by the police on January 9, 2015. Aged between 29 and 68 years old, they face sentences ranging from ten years in prison to life imprisonment. Three of them are judged by default, including Hayat Boumeddiene, Coulibaly’s ex-companion, not found since her flight to Syria a few days before the attacks.

In the box, Ali Riza Polat is the one who risks the biggest. Presented as “the right arm” of Amédy Coulibaly and the linchpin of the attacks, this 35-year-old Franco-Turkish, tried for “complicity” in terrorist crimes, refutes any responsibility for the attacks, ensuring that he knew nothing about the projects mortiferous Coulibaly.

Blamed for having sought and supplied weapons to the murderous trio, his co-defendants, repeat offenders hitherto never convicted of terrorism, have denied any radicalization and proclaimed their innocence.

The defense will plead from Tuesday afternoon.

The verdict is expected on December 16.

The 10 most expensive cities to live

Ibex 35: not afraid of heights