ESO’s telescope captures a beautiful “space butterfly”

A telescope at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), located in northern Chile, captured sharp images of a “space butterfly,” a gas bubble known as NGC 2899.

releaseESO reported that “it is the first time that an image of this object has been obtained in such detail, even the faint outer edges of the planetary nebula are distinguished by shining on the background stars.” “Data-reactid =” 13 “> En A statement, ESO reported that “it is the first time that an image of this object has been obtained in such detail, including the faint outer edges of the planetary nebula shining on the background stars.”

According to observatory researchers, the vast swaths of NGC 2899 gas extend up to a maximum of two light years from its center.

The object, located between 3,000 and 6,500 light years away, in the southern constellation Vela, has two central stars that are believed to be responsible for its almost symmetrical appearance.

The bubble “glows more brightly, in front of the stars of the Milky Way, as the gas reaches temperatures above ten thousand degrees”, they highlight in ESO.

The high temperatures are due to the large amount of radiation coming from the parent star, causing the hydrogen gas in the nebula to glow with a reddish halo around the oxygen gas, which glows blue.

star reaches the end of its life and detaches from its outer layers, another star interferes with the gas flow, giving shape to the double lobe that can be seen in the photo. “data-reactid =” 29 “> Experts point out that when one star reaches the end of its life and detaches from its outer layers, another star interferes with the gas flow, giving shape to the double lobe that can be seen in the photo.

Astronomers were able to capture this image with a high level of detail, using the FORS instrument (FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph, focal reducer and low dispersion spectrograph).

This high-resolution instrument was one of the first to be installed at ESO and is behind many of the observatory’s beautiful images and discoveries.

FORS has allowed us to observe light emitted by gravitational waves, investigated the first known interstellar asteroid, and has been used to further study the physics behind the formation of complex planetary nebulae.

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