Digital cameras, both SLRs and phones, make it easier to get better photos, but this does not mean that we always get perfect results. There are situations that can “trick” our cameras, causing some images to appear too bright or dark. Therefore, managing exposure compensation appropriately is very helpful.

exposition manual, and all thanks to this tool. Its name – exposure compensation – may sound complicated, but it’s actually an easy way to adjust the brightness on virtually any camera, including the one on the phone. “Data-reactid =” 13 “> Actually, it’s a way It is very easy to correct this type of situation, even if you do not know how to use manual exposure, and all thanks to this tool. Its name –exposure compensation– may sound complicated, but in reality it is an easy way to adjust the brightness in virtually any camera, including the phone.

What is exposure compensation?

Simply put, exposure compensation is a quick way to adjust the exposure value (EV) of your camera’s metering system. When you increase the EV value, you are getting a brighter image; decreasing it will make the image darker. Exposure compensation doesn’t tell you how it makes your image brighter or darker, but that’s the point: You don’t have to worry about shutter speeds, f-stops, or ISO settings.

For cameras that offer manual controls, keep in mind that exposure compensation doesn’t really affect your photos if you shoot in manual mode, but it will work in both shutter and aperture priority.

It is important to understand that exposure compensation is not the same as setting the exposure manually or using exposure lock: the exposure remains automatic and the camera can make adjustments from shot to shot as the light changes. But if you find yourself in a situation where you know your camera is prone to underexposure or overexposure, using exposure compensation will instruct the camera to balance between what it thinks is right and what you think it is. Right.

If, for example, you’re trying to photograph something indoors in front of a bright window, the camera may want to expose what’s outside the window, making the subject too dark. Adding +1 or +2 EV exposure compensation can fix this.

Where’s the exposure compensation setting?

On a phone, location depends on the specific app you’re using, but you can usually find exposure compensation in the default camera app by simply pressing and holding your finger on the screen. This will lock focus and exposure in that area of ​​the frame and allow you to raise or lower the brightness simply by dragging your finger. You have probably done this before without knowing it was called exposure compensation.

In dedicated cameras, exposure compensation is always represented by a sliding scale with a zero in the middle. Some cameras may have dedicated dials for exposure compensation, while others will have a button or menu option. In both a camera menu and on a button, exposure compensation is identified by a universal plus / minus symbol (some applications on the phone’s camera may also use this symbol).

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Depending on the camera, you can adjust the exposure by 1/2 or 1/3 stops. Going to +1 or +2 means you are making the exposure one or two brighter full stops. Negative numbers indicate that you are making the exposure darker.

Note: A “stop” represents a doubling or halving of the exposure; An image taken at +1 EV will be twice as bright as an image taken at 0 EV. Conversely, setting exposure compensation to -1 EV will result in half that amount of light at 0 EV.

When should I use exposure compensation?

Modern cameras have the ability to perfectly measure exposures most of the time, but there are cases when you would rather take control of the exposure with your own hands.

Like the aforementioned example of photographing a subject against a bright background, the opposite situation may also require exposure compensation. A well-lit subject against a shady background could trick your camera’s sensor, which will try to light up all the darkness in the background, causing overexposure of the subject. In this situation, move the exposure compensation meter to the negative side to darken the photo. The end result is that the main subject of the photo will be adequately exposed. You may have to test with different levels of compensation to find the perfect exposure.

compact and mirrorless cameras, you can see the effect of exposure compensation on the screen as you make adjustments. When using the optical viewfinder on a DSLR, you obviously won’t be able to see the effect until you reproduce the image. In this case it is important to remember to turn off exposure compensation before moving to a new location, otherwise you may accidentally shoot your child’s soccer game at +3 EV and end up with a set of overexposed photos. “Data-reactid = “67”> In live view cameras such as telephones, compact cameras and mirrorless cameras, you can see the effect of exposure compensation on the screen as you make adjustments. When using the optical viewfinder on a DSLR, obviously you will not be able to see the effect until the image plays. In this case it is important to remember to turn off exposure compensation before moving to a new location, otherwise you may accidentally shoot your child’s soccer game at +3 EV and end up with a set of overexposed photos.

high dynamic range or fill flash. “data-reactid =” 68 “> Exposure compensation can’t solve all exposure problems either. If you’re trying to adequately expose a dark subject and a bright background, it won’t be able to help you. In this case you will need other techniques such as high dynamic range composition or fill flash.

Indicated for beginners or photographers who use the phone, exposure compensation is a very easy way to help you get great pictures in difficult lighting situations without worrying about what is really going on under the hood.

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