The first bionic eye is ready to be tested in humans

cortical blindness is about to be tested in humans. “data-reactid =” 12 “> A revolutionary device developed by Australian researchers that will restore vision in people suffering from cortical blindness is about to be tested in humans.

Cortical Frontiers from Monash University, who have been working on a cortical vision instrument for more than a decade. “data-reactid =” 13 “> This was announced by those responsible for the Cortical Frontiers project at Monash University, who have been working for more than a decade working on a cortical vision instrument.

implants miniature wireless electronics, which are placed on the surface of the brain and that they have the ability to restore vision. “data-reactid =” 14 “> Researchers developed miniature wireless electronic implants, which are placed on the surface of the brain and have the ability to restore vision.

Preliminary studies – conducted in sheep – showed that the technology could help patients with neurological conditions who would not otherwise have treatment alternatives.

Monash University

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Cortical blindness is the loss of vision resulting from an injury to areas of the brain related to visual function, but where the eye maintains its capabilities intact.

According to the researchers, many clinically blind people have damaged optic nerves, preventing signals from being transmitted from the retina to the brain’s “center of vision.”

Gennaris’ bionic vision system can reverse this damage.

Neuralink by Elon Musk, which promises to combat neurological diseases through a chip that is implanted in the brain. “data-reactid =” 30 “> The project -at least on paper- resembles Elon Musk’s Neuralink initiative, which promises fight neurological diseases through a chip that is implanted in the brain.

How does it work

Gennaris comprises a custom harness with a camera and wireless transmitter, a vision processing unit, software, and a set of 9 by 9 mm plates that are implanted in the patient’s brain.

The scene captured by the video camera in the helmet is sent to the vision processor, similar in size to a smartphone, where useful information is extracted.

The data is transmitted wirelessly to a circuit within each implanted plate. This converts the data into a pattern of electrical pulses, which stimulate the brain through microelectrodes, as thin as a hair.

The system creates a visual pattern from combinations of up to 172 points of light (phosphenes), which provides information for the individual to navigate indoors and outdoors, in addition to recognizing the presence of people and objects around them.

“Cortical vision prostheses aim to restore visual perception for those who have lost their vision by applying electrical stimulation to the visual cortex, the region of the brain that receives, integrates and processes visual information,” said Arthur Lowery, Director of the Monash Vision Group.

The researchers are expecting a second stage of project funding, which will be announced in late 2020, which will allow them to start human trials and commercialize the project, said Professor Marcello Rosa.

“With additional investment, we will be able to manufacture these cortical implants in Australia on the scale necessary to progress to human trials,” said the researcher.