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Will virus mutations affect vaccines?

This week, Íker Jiménez’s monograph on COVID-19 focused on possible mutations. “The SARS-CoV-2 is like a kind of big copier that is permanently working because its life belongs to those copies. But there may be copy failures. The D614G is one of those mutations causing variations on this wave, “explained the presenter by way of introduction.

Íker Jiménez with a deferred appearance of Fernando Simón.

By mutating, a virus can gain a new ability to withstand harsh conditions or reproduce more efficiently. In the second wave, according to the program, a new strain, 20AEU1, was generated in Spain and jumped to Europe since JulyAlthough it is unknown what caused this mutation.

Dr. José Alcamí, coordinator of the Coronavirus Analysis Group of the Carlos III Institute, explained some of the keys: “Fortunately, the coronavirus, of RNA viruses, it is the one with the least capacity for mutation. It accumulates like three mutations a month, which is very little compared to the HIV virus that can accumulate hundreds of mutations monthly. The coronavirus is one of the most stable RNA viruses there is ”.

A virus that mutates little

But how will these mutations affect the effect of the vaccine that is already prepared? “For now, we can say that these virus mutations are not extensive enough for a virus carrying these mutations to be immune to the vaccines that we are now beginning to generate ”, assured Dr. Javier Cantón.

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